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Bernese Mountain Dog Puppies: Buying Guide

Bernese Mountain Dog Puppies: Buying Guide
Bernese Mountain Dog Puppies

Bernese Mountain Dog or Berner is one of the best family dogs. These dogs are gentle, kind, friendly, intelligent, with mellow temperaments. Berner is great with children and other pets. On the other hand, Berners are loyal, devoted, protective, but not aggressive. Therefore, it’s no surprise that there is such a demand for Bernese Mountain Dog puppies. 

However, many people rush with the decision to buy a Berner without the proper knowledge of the dog’s size, needs, or health issues. Also, many would-be owners buy Berner puppies from shady breeders that put profit in the first place and don’t care much about the health of the dogs.

There are many things to consider when buying a new dog and we will go through the most important in this article.

Is Bernese Mountain Dog A Right Dog For Me?

Bernese Mountain dogs are between 23 and 27.5 inches tall and weigh between 70 and 115 pounds. As you can see these are large dogs that require plenty of space. Therefore, if you live in a small apartment or house and don’t have a fenced yard, then Berner is probably not the dog for you. 

Also, Bernese Mountain Dog is an energetic dog that requires plenty of exercises and physical activity to stay happy and healthy. So, if you are a couch potato and don’t have will or time for at least an hour of walk every day, the Berner is not for you.

You also need to be aware that the larger the dog the larger the expenses and grooming needs. Let’s start with food. Berners are large dogs and they will eat a lot. Therefore, take into account that you will need more money for food. Also, Bernese Mountain Dogs are susceptible to certain health issues that can deplete your budget. 

Berners also shed a lot. Therefore, be prepared for daily brushing and vacuuming if you want to own a Barner. Not to mention potential slobber and drool after eating or drinking.

Since Bernese Mountain Dogs are affectionate and need almost constant companionship, there is a high possibility of developing separation anxiety. When a Berner is unhappy, he tends to manifest that unhappiness through destructive behavior.

These are all potential problems and issues you as a Bernese Mountain Dog owner can come across. It’s not our intention to discourage you from buying a Bernese Mountain Dog puppy but to show what you can expect.

Choosing The Right Breeder

Probably the most important step when buying a Bernese Mountain dog puppy is to find a good breeder that takes care of the health of his dogs. Unfortunately, this is also where many people rush and buy puppies from irresponsible, profit-oriented breeders. The results are obvious, puppies with a high probability of developing hereditary health issues. These breeders usually sell puppies at lower prices, but in the end, most of their customers spend a lot more money on dog’s medical bills. 

Therefore, you need to be very careful about who you are buying the Bernese Mountain Dog puppies. But, how to recognize a good breeder?

Well, there are several tell-tale signs that you are dealing with a good breeder that cares about his dogs. 

A good breeder will: 

  • Not sell you puppies without first meeting you or at least asking you a few interview-like questions over the phone.
  • Encourage you to research if the Bernese Mountain dog is a good dog for you.
  • Have no problem talking about the quality of his puppies, show you their pedigree, health, and genetic clearances. 
  • Invite you to come and visit his facility, ask him questions, meet and interact with puppies. 
  • Not allow puppies to go to a new family until they are eight weeks old.
  • Not sell puppies to a pet store or a broker.
  • Require that you sign the contract outlining both your and his responsibilities. 
  • Generally, a reputable breeder will not sell his puppies cheap.

Choosing A Puppy

When you visit a breeder, take some time to observe puppies. Observe how they play and interact with other puppies. Avoid shy and fearful puppies, but also overly aggressive and dominant puppies. When looking for a good puppy, look for the one that is confident, playful, and social. 

Interact with the puppies you find the most interesting. Test their hearing, sight, coat while playing with them. 

Always ask for the health and genetic clearances for the puppy you are planning to buy. Also, if possible meet the parents and observe their personalities and behavior.