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Beagle Bulldog Mix: What You Have To Know

Beagle Bulldog Mix: What You Have To Know
Beagle Bulldog Mix

Many people ask, “What is a Beabull dog?” And “What is a Beabull Puppy?” Have you heard of Beabull – the Beagle Bulldog mix?

Whether you’ve never heard of the Beagle Bulldog mix or just looking for more Beabull information, you’ve come to the right place.

This is your Complete Guide to the Beabull – the Beagle Bulldog Mix!

The bulldog and beagle are popular breeds. Each of these dogs is the most popular breed in their respective group.

In fact, the bulldog is the fourth most popular breed of dog in America. But the beagle is coming behind as the fifth.

Since mixed breeds are not as well documented as pure breeds, we cannot know exactly how popular the Beagle and Bulldog mix is.

However, given the rise in popularity of mixed breeds in general, and the popularity of the two parent breeds, it’s safe to say that there is huge interest in Beabulls and Beabull puppies.

Already fascinated? Then read on for more Beabull info.

History of the Beabull

To be clear, when we talk about the Beabull we are talking about the English Bulldog Beagle mix.

The American Bulldog Beagle Mix and French Bulldog Beagle Cross are also interesting mixes. But they differ genetically from the English Beabull.

The origins of the Beabull dog breed, like most mixed breeds, are not clear. But we can guess that they began in the United States over the past two to three decades.

However, we do know more about the origins of the parent breeds.

The term “beagle” was founded in England as a collective term for sniffer dogs from the Middle Ages, but the modern beagle was introduced in the mid-19th century.

The number of small sniffer dogs dwindled, but the trend towards fox hunting made them increasingly popular.

Hunters began to crossbreed their sniffer dogs, choosing them for tracking skill and small size. Which eventually led to the Beagle as we know it today.

The oldest known record of the bulldog dates back to the 16th century.

This breed was bred for bull bait in England and breeders were chosen for the large head and shoulders, as well as for fearless and aggressive personalities.

When blood sports were banned in 1835, breeders bred for gentler, calmer personalities to sell bulldogs as pets.

Both the Beagle and Bulldog tend to be patient, cute, and friendly, but with a stubborn streak so Beabull can be expected to have these traits too.
Both the Beagle and Bulldog tend to be patient, cute, and friendly, but with a stubborn streak so Beabull can be expected to have these traits too.

How big do Beabulls get?

Since beagles and bulldogs are of similar heights, this aspect of Beabull size is pretty easy to estimate.

The typical Beabull is fully grown and is between 13 and 15 inches tall. If the Beagle parents are less than 13 inches, the Beabull pups may also be smaller.

Beabull weight

On the other hand, for a full height Beabull, weight is much less predictable.

13 to 15 inch Beagles weigh between 20 and 30 pounds, while Beagles 13 inches and smaller weigh less.

Male bulldogs, on the other hand, weigh around 50 pounds while females weigh around 40 pounds.

An adult Beabull can weigh anywhere in this range, but it will usually fall somewhere in the middle.

So a male Beagle Cross Bulldog can weigh anywhere from 20 to 50 pounds, but most often falls in the 30 to 40 pound range.

A female can weigh anywhere from 20 to 40 pounds, but is most likely close to 30 pounds.

Coat of the Beagle Bulldog Mix

The bulldog and beagle have pretty similar coats, so there isn’t much variety in the beabull coats.

The Beabull has a smooth, hard layer that lies close to the body.

It can be short or medium length, and the beabull can inherit the beagle’s dense double coat.

The beabull is a light or moderate scrub and needs to be brushed two to three times a week.

If the Beabull has a double coat, daily brushing is likely necessary in the spring.

Most Beagle Bulldog puppies inherit the bulldog’s short tail, short and wrinkled face, and beefy legs, but usually they don’t have these traits as extreme as purebred bulldog puppies.

They may not have any of these properties either.

Grooming

The breed’s folded ears can trap moisture, so they should be checked weekly to prevent infection.

Similarly, facial wrinkles or wrinkles also need to be checked to make sure that food, moisture, and debris are not trapped. That can lead to infection and skin fold dermatitis.

Any debris can be removed with a cotton ball dipped in peroxide, and cornstarch can be used as a drying aid. However, neither should be used around the eyes.

Beagle Bulldog Mix temperament & behavior

Both the Beagle and Bulldog tend to be patient, cute, and friendly, but with a stubborn streak so Beabull can be expected to have these traits too.

Beabulls love their families, especially children, and are happiest when they are with them.

They get along well with other dogs and may prefer a multiple dog household.

The rest of a Beabull’s personality can be similar to a bulldog, beagle, or a mix of both.

Like bulldogs, Beabulls can be devoted, gentle, and relaxed, with a love of chewing and playing tug of war.

Many people ask, "What is a Beabull dog?" And "What is a Beabull Puppy?" Have you heard of Beabull - the Beagle Bulldog mix?
Many people ask, “What is a Beabull dog?” And “What is a Beabull Puppy?” Have you heard of Beabull – the Beagle Bulldog mix?

Beabull training

Both breeds are very food motivated, so treats are great motivators during exercise.

Bulldogs can dispose of their food territorially, however, so owners should take food for their Beabull puppy (before returning it, of course), including directly from the dog’s mouth, to prevent food attacks.

The Beabull should never be allowed to put any part of a human or any other animal in the mouth, even in a gentle manner.

The breed’s powerful jaws make it easy for accidental injuries to occur.

Socialization and training courses are a must for Beabull puppies.

Beabull health problems

As you may have guessed from evidence of previously raised health issues, the Bulldog is not a healthy breed with a lifespan of only 8 to 10 years.

Many of the breed’s problems result from brachycephaly, including difficulty sleeping, an increased risk of gagging and gagging, snoring, and various breathing problems.

Bulldogs also face many problems with reproduction and childbirth because of their large hips and narrow heads.

Bulldogs often have difficulty breeding, and female bulldogs most often have to give birth by caesarean section.

The Beagle, on the other hand, is a relatively healthy breed and has an average lifespan of 10 to 15 years.

The most common problems in beagles are obesity and hip dysplasia.

Hip dysplasia affects almost a fifth of Beagles.
Hypothyroidism, epilepsy, and vision problems such as glaucoma are also common in beagles.

Beabulls are at risk of serious health problems, particularly obesity, joint dysplasia, and visual impairment, as these two breeds are common.