Skip to Content

My Dog Has To Sleep Touching Me – What To Do

My Dog Has To Sleep Touching Me – What To Do

Sharing is caring!

All dog owners love being close to their canines. However, having some time alone can also be nice. Especially at night, when all you want is to get the beauty sleep you need. However, if your dog is a little overly attached, he might want to be close to you even in those moments. So if you’re wondering — Why does my dog has to sleep touching me? — we might have an answer.

Take steps right away

First of all, know that this is an issue that you want to solve rather sooner than later. Because you don’t want your dog to get too used sleeping while touching you. As nice as it is to feel that strong connection to our canines, we have to know where to draw the line. That way your dog will still feel loved and nourished for, while respecting your boundaries.

You have to tackle that issue wisely and in a way that will still make sense for your canine and his affectionate nature.

Sleeping pressed against your dog can hinder you from getting the rest you need. You won’t be able to get comfortable, their body temperature may be an issue too, and if your dog is of a larger breed, he might just be taking up too much space in your bed. Either way you don’t have to feel guilty about not wanting your dog in your bed with you at night. However, there are some things that you will have to do to make sure that your pup is sleeping comfortably too.

Why does my dog has to sleep touching me?

There are many different reasons as to why dogs like to sleep touching their owners. Some of the most common ones include:

  1. Separation anxiety
  2. They are used to your scent
  3. They get scared during the night

The best way to solving this issue would be to get to the bottom of the problem. Try to find out what the exact problem is that your dog has to sleep touching you. If you suspect that your dog is suffering from separation anxiety, contact your vet. Your dog will possibly need some behavioral training and even medications to get over the problem.

However, sometimes the reason is as simple as your dog thinking your bed is comfortable and your arm is the best possible pillow. Dogs like to be cozy just as much as we do, and they will appreciate a good quality mattress for their good night sleep.

If your dog is feeling uncomfortable and scared at night because of some weird noises coming from the outside, you will have to close your windows while their sleeping so your pup doesn’t get waken up.

After getting to the root of the problem, there will be some simple steps that you could take to stop your dog from having to sleep while touching you.

Here are our top tips for dog owners wondering “Why does my dog have to sleep touching me?!”

First tip: Invest in a good-quality dog bed!

Just like we do, our dogs need a comfortable and cozy place to sleep. And not any dog bed will do the trick!

If you decide to invest in a good quality dog bed, know that it can possibly last for more than a decade!

If your dog has a good place to sleep, he won’t be so tempted to jump on your bed every night. In addition to this, he will also have a place to take his daytime naps. Good sleep is essential for the overall health of a canine, and a good dog bed is the first step.

If you are unsure as to what dog bed to get, we tackled this topic in many different articles.

Here are just some of them:

Second tip: Get your scent on your dog’s bed

As weird as this sounds, it could actually do wonders.

The sense of smell in dogs in incredibly well developed, and they find a sense of safety and security in the scent of their owners.

Try rubbing your skin on your dog’s clean blanket and put it on his bed. That way he will feel close to you even while not being right next to you.

This is even a common strategy that is used when separating puppies from their mothers.

Third tip: Close your bedroom door

While this definitely isn’t the best approach when it comes to this issue, it can still be useful in some situations.

By simply closing your bedroom door your dog won’t be able to enter and jump on your bed. However, he may also feed neglected and start to freak out.

This is a pretty harsh solution that could however work with some dogs. Especially the more stubborn ones.

Fourth tip: Wait for your dog to go to sleep first

If your dog likes to fall asleep wherever you are, try staying up past their bedtime and then sneak out to your bed afterwards. While this method isn’t ideal, it can work for many dogs who just can’t fall asleep without their owners being near.

Patiently wait for your pup to doze off on their bed and then simply move back to your own. If your pup isn’t a light sleeper he won’t even notice. Hopefully, he will stay on that spot for the whole night. You can also combine this method with the one above to make sure your dog won’t follow you back to the bedroom.

Sharing is caring!