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Why Is My Female Dog’s Private Area Swollen

Why Is My Female Dog’s Private Area Swollen
Why is my female dog’s private area swollen

Caring for a dog means caring for their health. That also means inspecting any weird changes that may happen to their body. So you might be surprised when you see something going on “down there”. If you’re concerned and wondering “Why is my female dog’s private area swollen?” know that you are not the only dog owner who experienced it.

Why is my female dog’s private area swollen?

If your dog’s private area is swollen it is most likely caused by a condition called “vaginitis”. Vaginitis is a condition that can be seen in any female dog, puppy or adult, spayed or not. It has a number of different causes and pet owners have to be aware of the different signs and symptoms.

Vaginitis needs professional treatment. It you delay taking your dog to a vet, it could lead to some serious complications.

What is vaginitis?

The vagina is the part of a female’s reproductive system, and vaginitis is the inflammation of that part. There are two different types of vaginitis: puppy vaginitis and adult vaginitis. Puppy vaginitis is seem in young and intact female dogs, while adult vaginitis is more common in spayed, adult dogs.

What are the signs of vaginitis in dogs?

If your dog is furry and has a longer coat the signs of vaginitis may be a bit harder to notice.

However, the signs are quite obvious and they include:

  1. Inflamed and swollen vaginal area
  2. Excessive licking
  3. Increased urination
  4. Abnormal vaginal discharge

The key sign is an inflamed vaginal area. That means that your dog’s private part will be red, swollen and that she will most likely experience pain or discomfort.

If your dog has an abnormal discharge coming from her vagina, chances are that she will excessively clean her private part. Some dogs will even clean the discharge before their owners have the chance to notice it. In some cases mucus, pus, or even blood can be seem coming from your dogs vagina and landing on her fur, the floor or her bedding.

What causes vaginitis in dogs?

There are different things that could possibly cause vaginitis in dogs. Some of them include:

  1. Urinary tract infection. This happens when bacteria enters your dog’s urinary tract. The result of this infection can even be inflammation of the vagina.
  2. Unsanitary conditions. If you don’t keep dog’s private area clean, feces and/or urine could build up and cause vaginitis. Regularly groom your dog and keep this areas as clean as possible.
  3. Birth defects. Some birth defects like an ectopic ureters or a poor conformation of the vulva could contribute to vaginitis.
  4. Vaginal tumors. A tumor in the vulva or vagina can lead to vaginitis.
  5. Trauma. Injuries can cause inflammation in your dog’s private areas and therefore vaginitis.
  6. Foreign bodies. Small items like sand, seeds or other plant pieces could end up in your dog’s vaginal opening. These could lead to the formation of vaginitis.

Diagnosing vaginitis

If you think that your dog has vaginitis, schedule an appointment with your vet. A veterinarian should perform a physical examination of your pet. They may also take samples of your female dog’s vaginal discharge with a cotton swab.

Your vet may also decide to run some other tests like cytology tests, bacterial cultures or a vaginoscopy.

Treating vaginitis

If you frantically googled “Why is my female dog’s private area swollen” you might just be here to find a quick treatment and help her. However it isn’t that easy.

If your dog really has vaginitis, she will need professional help, which means that you have to take her to a vet to get a full diagnosis and treatment plan.

Depending on how severe the condition is, your bitch may need antibiotics alongside some other drugs. Some dogs may benefit some topical treatments too.

If the inflammation is due to a tumor or foreign body, your dog may even need surgery.

Thankfully, in most cases, vets will treat vaginitis in less invasive ways.

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